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Princeton University
12/23/2015
about 1 hour
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Paul Muldoon holds the Howard G.B. Clark chair in the Humanities at Princeton University. He has served as the poetry editor at the The New Yorker since 2007. He is the author of 12 major collections of poetry, including "Horse Latitudes," "Hay," and "One Thousand Things Worth Knowing." This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Paul Muldoon — A Conversation with Verse." Find more at onbeing.org.
06/03/2015
about 1 hour
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In celebration of Death, Sex & Money's one year anniversary, we brought two married couples, one Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, a rock band, a dog and a turquoise couch onto the stage at BAM for a special live show during WNYC's RadioLoveFest. First, I sat down with the author, Slate columnist and Barneys ambassador Simon Doonan, and his "impossibly younger" husband, the pottery mogul and designer Jonathan Adler. We talked about their first date (Adler wore rollerblades) and all that's happened since. Then, poet Tracy K. Smith got candid about one of the first times she used language to establish an emotional relationship – during a "chaste epistolary romance" with one of her high school teachers. She burned the letters in college, but her writing career continued. W. Kamau Bell, whom you may have heard on a recent episode talking about the fallout from his FX show coming to an end, joined us with his wife, Melissa Hudson Bell. And they brought some good news: Kamau has a new show coming out next year on CNN, called The United Shades of America. The show won't keep them from raising their daughters in the Bay Area, where they have an extended family network. We talk about that, and about teaching biracial children about race – and then, racism. And I share a few words about the origin of this show itself. The idea for Death, Sex & Money really started about four years ago, in a crappy Williamsburg apartment, on the night I decided to get a divorce. Thank you for listening. And please don't stop, because this is going to keep getting better. Hear our house band for the evening, Luscious Jackson, performing their hit song "Naked Eye" live during our show.   Luscious Jackson - Naked Eye   (Richard Termine)   (Richard Termine)   (Richard Termine)  
11/07/2016
about 1 hour
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Coming up on today's show: With less than 24 hours to go before Election Day, Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich gives us an update on the race for the White House.  How are citizens around the world viewing the U.S presidential election? Today we hear from Charles Maynes, an independent radio producer and reporter based in Moscow, and Tom Mitchell, Beijing bureau chief for The Financial Times. For the last few months, The Takeaway has been interviewing individuals in each of the 15 community types identified by the American Communities Project to get a sense of the issues that are affecting people where they live ahead of Election Day. Today, we hear from Russell Ballenger, an activist from the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. With help from a couple researches from the University of Nebraska, a team at WNYC Radio has come up with a way to measure stress during the election by analyzing saliva. Amanda Aronczyk, a reporter for WNYC and the Only Human podcast, and Elaine Chen, a producer for WNYC's Only Human podcast, explain. There's been a lot said about anxiety and politics this election season, but it isn't a new phenomenon, according to Shana Kushner Gadarian, an associate professor of political science at Syracuse University's Maxwell School and co-author of "Anxious Politics: Democratic Citizenship in a Threatening World." A day before the election, we do a final check in on the polls with Sam Wang, a neuroscientist at Princeton University and a data analyst and founder of the Princeton Election Consortium. How are young people thinking about the 2016 election? We hear from four high school students at Excelsior Academy in Newburgh, New York. 
04/25/2017
about 1 hour
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Coming up on today's show: This weekend, Donald Trump will cross the 100-day mark of his presidency. Does it make sense to judge a president in the first 100 days? Where did this practice come from, and what do the first 100 days tell us about the future direction — or success — of a presidency? Alexis Coe, a historian and co-host of the podcast "Presidents are People Too," and Julian Zelizer, a political historian at Princeton University and a contributor to CNN, weigh in.  Across the Great Lakes region, people are paying close attention to President Trump's proposed budget, which could eliminate $300 million in annual funding for clean up across the Great Lakes. Dave Rosenthal, the managing editor of Great Lakes Today, explains what the cuts could mean to the region.   The federal government could shutdown this weekend if lawmakers can't come to an agreement on $1.4 billion in funding for the president's border wall. Kyle Dropp, co-founder and chief research officer of Morning Consult, explains how citizens view government shutdowns, and how they’ve impacted voting patterns in the past. Arkansas executed two convicted killers on Monday night after attorneys claimed that the first execution was botched. It's the first double-execution to be carried out in the nation since the year 2000. Tom Meagher, deputy managing editor at The Marshall Project and the website The Next to Die, which tracks scheduled executions across the country, explains what you need to know.  Across the world, advocates for human rights say we are facing a crisis: A crackdown on dissent. Are our rights to peaceful assembly and protest in danger? Olga Sadovskaya, deputy chair of the Committee Against Torture, a human rights organization providing psychological and legal assistance to torture victims in Russia, weighs in.  For someone to be convicted of a murder, a murder had to happen. But what happens when the medical examiner gets it wrong? That's the subject of our latest installment of our "Case in Point" series with The Marshall Project. Andrew Cohen, senior editor at The Marshall Project, and Jennifer Bukowsky, an attorney in Columbia, Missouri, discuss the case of Jessie McKim. The Takeaway needs your help! Please visit wnyc.podcastingsurvey.com and tell us a little about you and the podcasts you love in a five-minute, anonymous survey. We really appreciate your help — knowing more about you helps us make more of the shows you enjoy. Thank you from all of us at The Takeaway! 
01/29/2016
about 1 hour
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It's hard to accept that everyone eventually dies. How can we better understand death as a part of life? In this episode, TED speakers contemplate the end of life with wisdom and humor.
10/02/2015
9 minutes
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Oliver Morton, The Economist’s essays and briefings editor, discusses how changing attitudes towards geoengineering could change the world, literally
03/31/2012
about 1 hour
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Daniel Kahneman, author of Thinking, Fast and Slow, on The Machinery of the Mind. Kahneman is Emeritus Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs at Princeton University and the winner of the 2002 Nobel Prize in Economics.