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Communication
05/13/2016
about 1 hour
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The law allows me to kill myself, but what if I have a progressive illness and reach a stage when I long to end my life but cannot do so unaided. Isn't it needlessly cruel and illogical that as the law stands, no friend or family member or doctor can then help me die without risking prosecution and a possible jail sentence? No it isn't, say those who oppose legalising assisted suicide. Think of the pressures that would build once it became a legally sanctioned option - not least the pressure to extend the category of those whom it is permissible to help kill beyond the terminally ill to the old, the frail and even the mildly depressed. Think of the internal and external pressure on elderly relatives to seek assistance for an early exit so as to avoid being a burden and using up the family inheritance; or the pressure on the NHS to create more bed space. Would it not be better, say opponents of legalisation, to retain the kind of fudge we've got at the moment, allowing the Director of Public Prosecutions to give a nod and a wink to assisted suicide unless he suspects foul play? Or is that just a recipe for the very uncertainty - and attendant misery that gives rise to such passionate calls for a change in the law in the first place? We were joined by a panel of experts in 2011 to debate the motion "Assisted suicide should be legalised". Arguing in favour of the motion were Emily Jackson, Professor of Law at the London School of Economics; Mary Warnock, moral philosopher, life peer and former Member of House of Lords Select Committee on Euthanasia; and the late Debbie Purdy, a right-to-die campaigner who in 2009 won a landmark ruling to clarify the law on assisted suicide. Arguing against the motion were Lord Carlile QC, barrister, Liberal Democrat peer and chairman of Care not Killing; Baroness Finlay, Professor of Palliative Medicine at Cardiff University; and Richard Harries, former Bishop of Oxford and author of 'Questions of Life and Death: Christian Faith and Medical Intervention'. The debate was chaired by journalist and broadcaster Sue Lawley.
03/28/2017
15 minutes
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Listen to episode 147 of the Inspirational Living podcast: The Spiritual Power of Words. Edited and adapted from The Mental Cure by Warren Felt Evans. Spiritual Podcast Excerpt: The whole soul is sometimes in the words we utter, especially when, to use a common expression, they come from the heart, that is, from a love of life. The outward material body is not who we are, and is not a necessary part of humanity. It is the mind that defines you. And the mind is composed of two departments: love and intellect—which are outwardly manifested as affection and thought, and ultimately expressed in the words we say. Your words are charged with the very life of you — the vital force of your soul. They affect not only the mind, but they sink into the interior depths of our being. They are not like leaves loosened from the trees by an autumn wind, and strewn upon a lake to float upon its surface. They have spiritual gravity, which causes [...]
03/28/2017
about 1 hour
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Apparently, this whole merging of quantum field theory and general relativity business was a little more complicated than we initially thought and so we extended the podcast into a second hour. All of which is released on a single day! You're welcome humanity. And don't worry. We didn't entirely solve the problem. We just warmed it up for you. Any listener who can unify the four major forces wins...a Nobel Prize! Congratulations!!! In practice, the most important takeaway of the second part of the conversation is how we think about truth--it's about a series of practical tools that do better jobs of approximating reality--and the fact that because we both are super keen to democratize knowledge and make all of this accessible...Spiros is joining the Mixed Mental Arts dojo. In the car, he was super excited to have convos with Mixed Martial Artists, chefs, comedians and anyone else. So, get ready for that world. We're going to all roll together and evolve the best set of beliefs the world has yet seen. The fun is just starting 'cause it turns out we don't just need a Theory of Everything. We need Theories of Everything. We have a lot of work to do!