Popcast

Found sound fanatics: rejoice! In Popcast, Pop Up Archive's house podcast, we excavate gems from Pop Up Archive's public audio. Recordings range from 1904 wax cylinder songs to NASA's interstellar rumbles. Listen as we resurface and reexamine forgotten sounds in this series of intimate micro-podcasts.

Total Episodes11
5 minutes
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In the early 1900s, journalist and renaissance man Charles Lummis set out to capture and preserve the Spanish folk songs of California, including the voice of one talent in particular: Manuela García. Find "La Cara Negra" and dozens of other songs from the Autry collection on Pop Up Archive, or learn more about the Autry National Center's wax cylinder recordings.
6 minutes
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Astronauts don’t have days and nights like we do on earth, so they need some help regulating their sleep. Turns out, it takes a whole team of engineers down on earth to rouse NASA’s elite from their slumbers. In this Popcast, hear about the NASA tradition of "wake up songs" from Mission Control, including the one song that went too far. Written and produced by Eliza Smith, narrated by Eliza Smith and Jacob Winik, with editorial help from Emily Saltz. Audio from the NASA collection on Pop Up Archive: https://www.popuparchive.com/collections/1687
5 minutes
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When Maurice Sendak’s now classic children’s book In the Night Kitchen was released in 1970, it caused a scandal. Its protagonist, a young boy, is bare naked throughout the book, amidst a landscape phallic milk bottles and free-flowing liquids. Parents cried pornography. Armchair psychologists jumped to analyze its Freudian subtext. But the kids? They just laughed. In this Popcast, we play you excerpts from Sendak's 1970 conversation with legendary interviewer Studs Terkel. Sendak balks at the idea of writing down to kids. In fact, Sendak thinks it's the kids who have “crap detectors” that allow them to tap into the real spirit of his books. Together, Sendak and Studs consider that it's the adults who can’t understand children’s literature, and not the other way around. Hear the full interview in The Studs Terkel Radio Archive collection on Pop Up Archive, from The WFMT Radio Network: https://www.popuparchive.com/collections/938/items/37552
5 minutes
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It was the early days of the civil rights movement. Across the South, black students staged sit-ins, marches, demonstrations and protests that were violently repressed. In this podcast, two voices from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) talk about the song “We Shall Overcome” – three simple words that became an anthem of strength and conviction for their movement. Bernie Lafayette remembers hearing the song in February 1961 during 14 nights of demonstrations to enter the movie theaters of Nashville, Tennessee. Cordelia Jackson first heard the song in March of that year at a sit-in at the Jackson, Mississippi public library. "In my heart, when I was worried about my friends in jail, and how they might be pulled out and lynched or anything, I heard those voices saying: 'We Shall Overcome.'" These interviews were conducted in 1962 in Chicago on the occasion of a concert there by the Freedom Singers. The newly-formed quartet was touring the country in support of civil rights and the goals of SNCC. Reporter Brandi Howell produced this podcast using with archival audio of an interview conducted by Studs Terkel in 1962. The archival audio used in this episode comes courtesy of the Studs Terkel Radio Archive from the WFMT Radio Network in Chicago. Visit them at www.studsterkel.org or follow them on Twitter and Instagram @StudsArchive. You can find this podcast, along with thousands of archival recordings, at popuparchive.com/explore
5 minutes
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Host Eliza Smith uses the lens of astrology to understand Sylvia Plath's work, asking Bay Area astrologer Jessica Lanyadoo to analyze Plath's star chart. What follows is a tragic and insightful reading of Plath's personality. Archival audio courtesy of the Pacifica Radio Archives. See the astrological chart that Lanyadoo made for Sylvia Plath on our Tumblr.
6 minutes
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Astronauts don’t have days and nights like we do on earth, so they need some help regulating their sleep. Turns out, it takes a whole team of engineers down on earth to rouse NASA’s elite from their slumbers. In this Popcast, hear about the NASA tradition of "wake up songs" from Mission Control, including the one song that went too far. Written and produced by Eliza Smith, narrated by Eliza Smith and Jacob Winik, with editorial help from Emily Saltz. Audio from the NASA collection on Pop Up Archive: https://www.popuparchive.com/collections/1687
6 minutes
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It was 1950, just five years after the US dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The Soviet Union had just built their own bomb. And what did Americans, huddled around their radios, most want to hear? Comedian Bob Hope, joking about the world "blowing itself up." In this Popcast, Eliza Smith talks about "The Quick and the Dead," a 1950 NBC special about atomic energy, hosted by Bob Hope. Original audio can be found on Pop Up Archive, courtesy of The Broadcast Archives at WILL and Illinois Public Media.
7 minutes
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The rooms were full of menstrual blood and Kotex, rubber breasts and stumbling brides, fragmented bodies in linen closets and simulacra of babies being born. It was 1972, and this was Womanhouse: a rickety Victorian house turned into a home for radical feminist installations by the students of Judy Chicago’s Feminist Art program at CalArts. A conversation between Chicago and writer Anaïs Nin offers insights into a volatile moment of Second-wave feminism. Produced by Adrian Shirk. The archival audio used in this episode comes courtesy of the Pacifica Radio Archives. Visit them at pacificaradioarchives.org or call 1-800-735 0230. You can also check out their own archival radio show, "From The Vault," at fromthevaultradio.org. Find this podcast, along with thousands of archival recordings, at popuparchive.com/explore Music from the Free Music Archive: "Maura and Dana," "You're Gonna Find Out," and "Never Smile" by Big Quiet (CC BY NC ND); "My Sweetie Went Away" Bessie Smith (Public Domain); "Bowery at Midnight" and "A Room” by Happiness in Aeroplanes (CC BY NC SA); "Waltz to a Wood Thrush” by Kathleen Martin (CC BY NC SA); "Deserted City” by Kai Engel (CC BY NC). Audio excerpts from from the 1974 film "Womanhouse:" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rnKllxfrF4 and "Judy Chicago & the California Girls:" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x07AtDl69F0