Dayjob

How musicians pay the rent. Day Job visits musicians at their day jobs. Whether they're slopping beans, drilling teeth or blowing leaves, these musicians challenge our conventional notions of success and remind us why we play music. With generous helpings of music, this podcast is a guaranteed fun time.

Total Episodes12
12/03/2014
16 minutes
 -
Mike Notter (currently with the bands Motopony and Hannalee) used to be in a band with a bunch of other window washers (Shim). Back then, cleaning windows was just a day job, something he did with his buddies before they started band practice at night. After Mike grew up and started a band and a family of his own, he learned how much the job had to teach him.
11/07/2014
10 minutes
 -
Emily Westman (of the band Sisters) came out to Seattle without a reason, without a plan. The band she'd traveled from Florida with broke up before they even got here. Without a friend's couch to crash on, she built a new life from Craigslist ads, playing music with every band that would take her, earning money painting houses and playing piano in the Space Needle restaurant. All that exploration helped Emily develop a unique musical voice and a fresh perspective on an old friend.
10/28/2014
2 minutes
 -
Day Job season 2 is coming! This mini-episode offers a preview of some of the voices you'll hear over the next season.
07/10/2014
13 minutes
 -
Ben Todd restores guitars for The Trading Musician in Seattle's Roosevelt neighborhood. And he's become deeply embedded in the local music scene. But it took four years living in the New Mexico wilderness and the shooting at Cafe Racer next door for him to recognize how much he valued the community around him.
06/05/2014
11 minutes
 -
Ivan Gálvez plays timbales with the Seattle band Picoso. But what I want to know is... with all the fancy medical equipment at his day job, can he read my mind?
05/02/2014
11 minutes
 -
Chris Cunningham fronts the Seattle band Ravenna Woods. He looks the part, too, with a lip ring, skinny jeans and facial hair. What he doesn't look like is a paralegal. That became a problem one day when the firm partners unexpectedly asked him to meet a client face to face.
04/23/2014
14 minutes
 -
Lesli Wood has achieved almost every goal she's set for herself. She's a professional lawyer. And her band, The Redwood Plan, has played to big crowds at Seattle's Bumbershoot Festival. She chalks it all up to a "ruthless" work ethic and good planning. But there's something in Lesli's life that didn't fit into her plans. A diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. And it's caused her to redefine what it means to succeed in music and in her day job.
03/05/2014
13 minutes
 -
Seattle's Matt Watson performs as a rapper and producer under the name Spekulation. He used to hate his day job serving espresso. After being outed as the cynical blogger behind "The Bitter Barista," Matt thought he'd never make espresso again. But then he found a tiny coffee shop at the center of Beacon's Hill's music scene. 
07/30/2014
13 minutes
 -
Tom Baisden is all about kids. He raises them, he teaches them, and as lead guitarist for The Not-Its!, he hops around on stage like a birthday clown for them. To reach kids, "you've got to have a shtick," explains Tom. It's a lesson he's learned from years of teaching special ed. But embracing that shtick isn't always easy. Especially when a buddy from Tom's old punk rock days came to watch a show. The friend stood in the back row behind mirrored sunglasses. He wore special grin on his face that said: "What the heck are you doing?"
05/30/2014
6 minutes
 -
RA Scion is a musician who's always had day jobs working with his hands. Physical labor, he says, inspires his music and connects him to the work of his ancestors back in the tobacco fields of Kentucky. In 2007, he used to blow leaves, walk dogs and wash cars as the maintenance guy for an elite condominium building in Seattle's Capitol Hill Neighborhood.  This bonus episode includes a profile of RA Scion dating from 2007. It was part of an experiment that ran 11 episodes over two years on Seattle Weekly's website.