Tape

A radio show about people who make radio, hosted by Mooj Zadie and Mickey Capper.

Total Episodes37
01/22/2015
about 1 hour
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Andrea Silenzi is the creator and host of Why Oh Why?. She's also the Senior Producer of Slate's The Gist.* "I listen to a lot of radio and there's so much of 'This person wrote a book.' 'This person has a project.' 'This person has been working on this for years.' And I just think that I much prefer conversations where people have a personal connection that's at stake. ... Like I always get the pitch of I want to do speed dating and it's like no one I've ever known has actually sincerely ever done speed dating. So If I were to do a show about speed dating it would be the most inauthentic thing possible." (*This episode is guest hosted by Avery Trufelman.)
11/03/2014
about 1 hour
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Pejk Malinovski is a poet and a radio producer. "I feel like when I make structure it's not a traditional Hollywood storyline where there's a beginning and a middle and an end and a conflict and resolution I think it's more about tension and release. I think it's more about composing musically basically."
09/11/2014
about 1 hour
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Stephanie Foo, a former producer at Snap Judgment, is a producer at This American Life. "I think everybody has a story that is worth telling, but I think most people don't know what their best story is. At all. They'll think that it's their most life or death moment or that it's the moment that they feel changed them the most, but sometimes it's the most surprising little moments that really touch people. And I don't even know necessarily what those moments are in my life."
07/16/2014
39 minutes
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Ann Heppermann, a Peabody Award winner, produces Slate's Culture Gabfest. She teaches radio writing and radio drama at Sarah Lawrence College. "I don't think you want all crappy tape, but there's something about texture of crappy tape and Skype tape. If you think about sound as a palette, I kind of like phone tape and I like how it adds an element of grit to it."
06/17/2014
about 1 hour
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Zoe Chace is a reporter for NPR’s Planet Money. "A lot of times people don't pay enough attention to their voicing at all. They don't realize that their story doesn't exist, unless people are grabbed by their voice. The story literally — like practically literally — is not happening. People are just missing it, so I always thought voicing is key, it's central. You have to grab people. And I had a real approach where I was almost trying to scream out of the radio, 'Listen now!' And, 'Listen now!' And, 'Listen now!'"
06/03/2014
about 1 hour
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Ellen Horne is the Executive Producer of Radiolab. “When you’re trying to create something new, that kind of risk-taking has to happen in a low-stakes environment.”
05/05/2014
about 1 hour
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Sean Cole, a producer at This American Life, has also reported for Radiolab, Marketplace, and 99% Invisible. "Journalism is a translation of madness, and poetry is a transcription of madness."
04/10/2014
about 1 hour
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Jennifer Brandel is the Senior Producer of Curious City. "I don't think that soft or fluffy news should be given such a bad rap. When you have a question that ignites someone's curiosity and gets them interested in thinking about the world in a different way or considering things they haven't done before, that is important. If you can accomplish that in your stories, they're not fluffy — they're interesting."
03/30/2014
about 1 hour
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Ben Calhoun is a producer at This American Life. "The nature of covering politics is one where often people don’t want to say to you the things that they are feeling or thinking. ... You can create the diorama of that action in a way that you couldn’t if you weren’t willing to make them a character — founded on things that they said and beliefs that you know they have — than they’ve done for you on tape."
05/27/2015
about 1 hour
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Anshuman Iddamsetty is Hazlitt’s art director and audio/visual producer.* "I stare at waveforms constantly. So like I'm staring at the layout of the waveforms more than anything. There is a sort of visual component to how the show finally comes together, right? I can tell how many — again I understand how out to lunch I sound now — but, if i’m being honest, I can kind of tell, “No, this sounds right because I can see the ratio of the a person’s cut up voice to the music to the sound effects to my voice, and the sort of compression of the guest coming in at certain points, or like how quickly a guest’s voice turns the corner." (*This episode is guest hosted by Ethan Chiel)