The Audit

Discover podcasts. Recommendations weekly from the Auditors.

Recommendations

03/25/2017 Dave and Cathy walk home from the latest movie about a load of astronauts that make a series of terrible choices.
This neat little offering just took home the Best New Show trophy at the British Podcast Awards and it's not hard to understand its appeal. Our hosts are an Irish couple living in the UK, media professionals, and regular movie-goers. They have cleverly identified that the best thing about going to a movie is dissecting it afterwards, so in The Cinemile they bring us their lightly edited walk-and-talks, recorded on the way home from the cinema. Their reviews are delivered in a state of post-theatre buzz, whether outraged or enraptured, that all film-lovers will recognise, and the wind whistling past them, or honking traffic, only adds to its fly-on-the-wall charm. It helps, too, that they are funny, prone to relatable bickering, and relatively brief, with episodes running 20 to 30 minutes long.
04/17/2017 Dave and Cathy walk home from "F8: Fast Fate 2 Furiously Fast - Family Edition", the latest in the ongoing soap-opera that is The Fast and the Furious.  Note: Cathy says the word 'stupid' more than they say the word 'family'.   
This neat little offering just took home the Best New Show trophy at the British Podcast Awards and it's not hard to understand its appeal. Our hosts are an Irish couple living in the UK, media professionals, and regular movie-goers. They have cleverly identified that the best thing about going to a movie is dissecting it afterwards, so in The Cinemile they bring us their lightly edited walk-and-talks, recorded on the way home from the cinema. Their reviews are delivered in a state of post-theatre buzz, whether outraged or enraptured, that all film-lovers will recognise, and the wind whistling past them, or honking traffic, only adds to its fly-on-the-wall charm. It helps, too, that they are funny, prone to relatable bickering, and relatively brief, with episodes running 20 to 30 minutes long.
03/17/2017Having kids seems very unappealing to Zak. He visits his therapist and some friends to begin to untangle his indecision. Meanwhile, Shira, Zak's wife, explains why she wants to be a mom. 
Question: do you want kids? For a lot of people, it's a big one, maybe the big one. In this indie documentary series, married couple Zak and Shira are asking themselves exactly that - or rather, Zak is asking it, because Shira already knows what she wants. She feel strongly that she wants a baby, but Zak is ambivalent; he likes kids, but he doesn't feel ready the way Shira does. We entered this series with some trepidation, worried that a straw man would be constructed and dissembled for our entertainment, and that Zak's half-hearted dithering would wear thin. Instead, we found a tender, tentative portrayal of the possibilities of parenthood or another, different life, featuring the couple's friends and family as well as special guests (e.g. Meghan Daum, editor of Selfish, Shallow and Self-Absorbed). Episodes Six and Seven raise the show to a new level, in a dizzying one-two punch that reminds us nothing is impossible, everything unknown, and pain a powerfully clarifying force. Seven episodes available now.
01/14/2017 Dave and Cathy's walk home from La La Land. Contains: singing, intense arguing about the ending and a whole lot of cold-induced sniffling. 
This neat little offering just took home the Best New Show trophy at the British Podcast Awards and it's not hard to understand its appeal. Our hosts are an Irish couple living in the UK, media professionals, and regular movie-goers. They have cleverly identified that the best thing about going to a movie is dissecting it afterwards, so in The Cinemile they bring us their lightly edited walk-and-talks, recorded on the way home from the cinema. Their reviews are delivered in a state of post-theatre buzz, whether outraged or enraptured, that all film-lovers will recognise, and the wind whistling past them, or honking traffic, only adds to its fly-on-the-wall charm. It helps, too, that they are funny, prone to relatable bickering, and relatively brief, with episodes running 20 to 30 minutes long.
04/26/2017 Muhammad Tariq's small, gender-integrated school in Panjur had been anonymously receiving literature that scolded them for teaching girls. Tariq and the other teachers didn’t take it seriously until six men with guns showed up. After the incident in his school, Tariq feared for his life; said he needed to get out of Pakistan. So he applied for and received a J1 visa, a cultural exchange program run by the US State Department.
04/19/2017 Long before we asked our white audience members to “come get your boy” (keep tweeting!: #WhitesAgainstTrump), activist and entrepreneur Michael Skolnik was using his privilege to support social justice movements and reform the criminal justice system all over the country. Whether it’s getting “I can’t breathe” t-shirts to LeBron James, advising celebrities making their first foray into political activism, or supporting grassroots organizers, Skolnik is all about listening to and building up others. So tune into this episode to learn about the work he’s done and the work still left to do – oh, and about that one time he talked to Trump about running for president... Follow Michael Skolnik on Twitter at @MichaelSkolnik and check out the news/politics/entertainment site he built with Russell Simmons: https://globalgrind.com/. And Kamau and Hari want to make you laugh! In person! Find tour dates and albums from your favorite hosts at www.harikondabolu.com and www.wkamaubell.com. As always, send us your thoughts and suggestions on Twitter and over email: @politicreactive or politicallyreactive@firstlook.org.
04/29/2017 Lea has been traveling around interviewing Trump supporters and she’s tried to do it differently. She’s gotten drunk with them and high with them, she’s road-tripped with them and stayed overnight in their kids’ bedrooms, she’s cried with them, dined with them, yelled at them (and vice versa) to bring the conversation to a new … Continue reading Lea in Trumpland: Alicia
04/24/2017In 1996, Richard Nicolas was #accused and #convicted of killing his two-year-old daughter. He's now spending the rest of his life in prison. The thing is - what if he didn’t do it? #truecrime #wrongfulconviction Social: @convictedpod Website: www.convictedpod.com Host: Brooke Gittings Social: @BrookeGittings Email: convictedpod@gmail.com Musical Genius: Blake Maples Social: @blakeofdaozarks His Website: www.blakemaples.com
You might already know Brooke Gittings from her popular podcast Actual Innocence, which features interviews with people who have been wrongfully imprisoned, including high-profile subjects like Jason Baldwin and Amanda Knox. She's not a lawyer, but a social worker, who developed an interest in wrongful conviction cases in those heady days that followed the launch of Serial and Making a Murderer. Now she's emerged with another podcast in a by-now classic mode. In 1996, Richard Nicolas was convicted of killing his toddler daughter, and has been in prison ever since. But Richard's legal team doesn't think he did it, and at this stage neither does Brooke, who is independently producing this series with the support of Richard and his team (Richard himself is not totally sure how a podcast works, but he does know they can have, in his words, "power"; Adnan Syed is housed in his block). Brooke is an amateur in almost every aspect of this effort, so the quality of what she's produced here is impressive, as is her passion for her subject. We're one episode in, with more to come bi-weekly.
04/11/2017The only thing Ken Perenyi loved as much as art was swindling the art world. He relished the contest of wits, the risk of getting caught, the thrill of deception, the sense of power that comes with a successful con. But more than anything else, he wanted to see his work get the recognition he always felt it deserved. This week, we speak to the man behind some of the greatest art frauds of the twentieth century.
We're all trying to make our fortunes. We're all motivated, to some degree, by self-interest and greed. But a small percentage of people are outliers. They look like us - they might even look better than us, aglow with charisma, possessed of a sparkle in the eye - but they think differently. Their brains are whirring away at the complex social arithmetic that will convince us to trust them. They want to make their fortune and ours. In this new Panoply series, New Yorker contributor Maria Konnikova exposes hucksters, con artists and frauds, making use of insights acquired through the writing of her book, The Confidence Game. Over 10 episodes, she brings us the stories of 10 fraudsters. They're all of different stripes, but cut from the same cloth: a boyfriend who has constructed an elaborate false life; a New Jersey living-room cult leader; a maker of expertly painted fakes. These gripping accounts are built from interviews with both victims and perpetrators and narrated by Konnikova. Though we are often left in awe of her subjects' skill and audacity, our host is careful not to glamorise them: these are criminals who hurt people, and she is telling us their stories as much to warn us as to titillate. Great stuff, weekly, with five episodes still to come.
04/25/2017A small secretive cult was started in the 1970s and operated out of New Jersey for decades without notice. A survivor tells us her dark story of abuse and manipulation at the hands of the charismatic cult leader, and how she eventually escaped his clutches.
We're all trying to make our fortunes. We're all motivated, to some degree, by self-interest and greed. But a small percentage of people are outliers. They look like us - they might even look better than us, aglow with charisma, possessed of a sparkle in the eye - but they think differently. Their brains are whirring away at the complex social arithmetic that will convince us to trust them. They want to make their fortune and ours. In this new Panoply series, New Yorker contributor Maria Konnikova exposes hucksters, con artists and frauds, making use of insights acquired through the writing of her book, The Confidence Game. Over 10 episodes, she brings us the stories of 10 fraudsters. They're all of different stripes, but cut from the same cloth: a boyfriend who has constructed an elaborate false life; a New Jersey living-room cult leader; a maker of expertly painted fakes. These gripping accounts are built from interviews with both victims and perpetrators and narrated by Konnikova. Though we are often left in awe of her subjects' skill and audacity, our host is careful not to glamorise them: these are criminals who hurt people, and she is telling us their stories as much to warn us as to titillate. Great stuff, weekly, with five episodes still to come.
05/02/2017 Charlie Warzel is a technology reporter who spent the last two weeks sitting right behind America's favorite conspiracy theorist Alex Jones in an Austin, TX courthouse. At stake in Alex Jones' custody dispute is whether the unhinged character he plays on InfoWars is real or as he claims "political satire." On 4/20, his ex-wife's attorneys asked him about an incident wherein he was "unable to recall the names of his children's teachers after eating a big bowl of chili" and another incident where smoked a joint on the air while appearing as a guest on Joe Rogan's podcast. Jones explained that he used marijuana nearly yearly "to monitor its strength, which is how law enforcement does it" and that marijuana was too strong as a result of a mind control conspiracy backed by billionaire George Soros. 
04/11/2017 Lucie and her husband Gerry were together for 13 years. People called them lovebirds. Until the fall of 2010, when she shot and killed him. And here's the thing: Lucie has no memory of killing him. This season on First Day Back, how do you come back from the worst thing you’ve ever done when you don't even remember doing it?
The second season of First Day Back, an indie darling in 2015, has been a long time coming. Season 1 followed host Tally Abecassis, a documentary filmmaker, as she made tentative moves back into the workforce after a long maternity hiatus. Gently expressed, but with a dead-eye for revealing detail, the series asked questions about the work of making art, of being married, and of motherhood. At the conclusion of that series, Tally told us Season 2 would feature someone else's first day back. We weren't expecting what she has now produced, but on reflection, it bears the hallmarks of Season 1: on its surface, mild-mannered and domestic, but containing a muddled darkness at its heart. In this first episode, we are introduced to Lucie, a middle-aged woman who shot and killed her common-law husband in 2010. Lucie has no memory of the shooting and no notion of what might have moved her to commit it. Now, she's getting out of prison, and ready to start her life again - but how can she truly start over when she doesn't remember the event that reset her life? This series is one to watch, like a hawk. New episodes weekly.
03/23/2017 A mild and meek man who was unusually attached to his domineering mother. That’s the story of Ed Gein, who murdered numerous middle-aged women in and around Plainfield, WI in the 1950’s, and whose story inspired the character of Norman Bates. The story of Psycho begins in a dingy, remote cabin, where Gein collected bits and pieces of his subjects and fashioned them into chairs, lampshades, or worse. All his victims were chosen because they reminded him of his mother. When he was buried, this was engraved on the headstone beside his: “Augusta Gein: Mother.” Gein’s story is a chilling beginning to one of the most famous stories in movie history. Subscribe to Inside Psycho so you never miss an episode: smarturl.it/Insidepsycho Thank you to our sponsors: Audible - Get a free audio book and a 30-day trial when you visit them here: www.audible.com/psycho Blue Apron - Get 3 meals free with free shipping by going to: www.blueapron.com/psycho Zip Recruiter - Try Zip Recruiter for free by going to: www.ziprecruiter.com/psycho We'd like to hear from you! Please complete a quick survey at www.wondery.com/survey or tweet at us @ItsInsidePsycho Have a question or comment? You can always give us a call at 424-224-5711... anonymous voicemails welcome.
Wondery's suite of audio stories expands again with this six-part series about the making of Psycho. Hitchcock's horror masterpiece was inspired by one of the creepiest true crime villains ever (OK, since you asked, serial killer Ed Gein, who crafted furniture and masks out of his victims' body parts FFS). Hitchcock made Psycho with his own money, against advice, and remained as antagonistic and obsessive throughout the production as he had ever been. He terrified Janet Leigh with corpse-pranks; tested a range of melons in search of the most realistic stabbing sound effects; and, once the film opened in cinemas, insisted that late-coming patrons be prevented from entering the theatre. Obviously there is fertile ground to plunder here and the series makes use of it all, leading us from Gein's real-life horror story to the production itself and its eventual public reception, with many scenes rendered in immersive soundscapes. All six 30-minute episodes are available now.
04/10/2017 When sex ed doesn't cover it, you've got to figure stuff out on your own. Follow Nancy on Facebook and Twitter and sign up for our newsletter at nancypodcast.org. Nancy is a production of WNYC Studios. Special thanks to Sarah Lu. Theme music by Alex Overington with scoring by Jeremy Bloom. Additional music by Arne Bang Huseby (“Stormy Blues”), Jalen Warshowsky (“Dollar Theater”), Josh Woodward (“Once Tomorrow” and “Grey Snow”), Anamorphic Orchestra (“Taking Dark Matter Lightly”), Joey Pecoraro (“Strong Vibes”), and Little Glass Men (“Kelp Grooves”).
This exuberant new show from WNYC already has us firmly by the heart. Nancy is a home for stories about the queer experience. That is to say, it's about specific LGBTQI experiences, but also universal matters of love and pain and growing up, and all the other vital stuff that makes us human. Hosts Kathy Tu and Tobin Low launch a charm offensive from minute one, and they sound like they've been doing it for years, which presumably they have been, just not on the air: the two are real-world best friends. They bring us deeply personal insights from their own lives, along with stories from guests. Witness: a) the hunt for an iconic Asian porn star; b) the recitation of secret love poems; c) an original song from a one-woman musical called Manifest Pussy, which had us pinned, transfixed, to our chair. Three episodes in, we're a little giddy on this: on its ready wit, and its wide-open way of looking at the world. Hear new instalments weekly, Sundays.
03/29/2017Have you attended any “Matthew parties” lately? Or ever felt “too blessed to be stressed, too anointed to be disappointed”? If the answer is yes, you speak Christianese, a "religiolect" that linguists have recently started tracking.