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A Cup of Jo

A daily lifestyle blog, founded by Joanna Goddard, covering everything from fashion to culture to parenthood.

Recommendations

03/17/2016Humans have been wearing makeup for a few thousand years now and yet, here in the US the chemicals used in them are still not understood and not really regulated. Delve into the history of makeup and the psychology and feminist theory around it.
What if when you typed something into Google, the answer was spoken back to you by dorky dudes who were extremely knowledgeable on the topic you queried? That’s what Stuff You Should Know does. Co-hosts Chuck Bryant and Josh Clark, both writers from HowStuffWorks, chat in an entertaining yet authoritative way about basically everything. Tornadoes! Cats! The Great Wall of China! This has earned them a long-held spot on the iTunes 10 most popular podcasts list. I recommend listening during your commute, which turns a dutiful part of your day into time well spent. You will be the star of your next cocktail party conversation.
06/05/2015 The Case:  A young boy finds an enchanting object in the street. The Facts:  Mystery Show is produced by Starlee Kine, Alex Blumberg, Melinda Shopsin and Eric Mennel. Producing help from Chris Neary and Wendy Dorr. Eli Horowitz is contributing editor. The show is engineered by John Delore. Thanks also to Matt Lieber. Logo by Arthur Jones.  Photo credit Brad and Greg. Special thanks to Carson Mell. The Music:  Original score by the band White Dove Closing song "Go Far" written and produced by Emmy the Great, performed by Emmy the Great, Leo Abrahams and David Gardener. Go Far was mixed by Dave McCracken. Additional score used in the episode was written, performed and mixed by Emmy the Great too. Opening theme song “Those Mysteries” was written by Russell Mael and Ron Mael and performed by Sparks. Our ad music is by Build Buildings. The Sponsors: Kind Snacks Squarespace (use offer code "Mystery" for 10% off)
The intrepid host, Starlee Kine, solves everyday mysteries (for example: Exactly how tall is the actor Jake Gyllenhaal, given that the internet doesn’t say?), presenting them through investigative shenanigans and often following tangents that are just as interesting as the main storyline. You feel an unexpected intimacy with the voices in your ear and a warm-fuzzy feeling as Kine cracks each case after just the right amount of suspense.
06/02/2014 Jerry Seinfeld was just 27 when he first appeared on Johnny Carson in 1981. And he stood out. His material wasn't about his upbringing or personal relationships.  It was about our universal experience of small things. His unique comedy style eventually led him to create his namesake show with Larry David. After Seinfeld ran for nine seasons, he decided to go back to stand-up, and to his audience.  As he explains to Alec, Seinfeld feels uniquely connected to his fans: “You have this relationship with the audience that is private between you and them.”
A couple years ago, after a slew of weird Twitter behavior and public brawls, Alec Baldwin was not the world’s most popular person. He even wrote an essay saying he wanted to hide away forever. And yet… he then debuted his own podcast, produced out of New York’s NPR station, and listeners fell in love with him all over again. Here’s the Thing, which releases episodes twice a month, presents intimate conversations between Baldwin and a vast array of greats — from Amy Schumer to George Stephanopoulos to the Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz. You’ll lose track of time listening to each episode, and Baldwin turns out to be a generous, knowledgeable host with one of the best radio voices you’ve ever heard.
04/04/2015Marnie the Dog is one of the most famous dogs on Instagram. Two years ago, she was near death at an animal shelter in Connecticut, now she has 1.2 million followers and hangs out with human celebrities.This week, we investigate the formula for internet dog fame, and look at how having a famous dog will completely upend your life. Thanks for listening. Subscribe to the show at www.itunes.com/replyall, or anywhere else you listen to podcasts. Help us with Email Debt Forgiveness Day by telling us about your email anxieties! Leave a voicemail at 1 (917) 475-6668. Also, to see an article about this episode on digg.com with tons more cute dog content, go to http://digg.com/2015/how-a-dog-goes-from-0-to-1-2-million-instagram-followers-in-a-year
Anyone susceptible to going down internet rabbit holes will find this show addictive. It’s a series devoted to the culture of the web — things like bizarre Instagram accounts, quirky corners of Reddit and unlikely YouTube sensations. Its hosts, PJ Vogt and Alex Goldman, are master storytellers in the vein of This American Life, who manage to make even the most obscure tale feel universally relevant. I broke out in a sweat hearing one of their subjects recount his story of the worst email he accidentally sent to an acquaintance. Afterward, he said, “I’m moving to Los Angeles soon, and I think a large reason is just so I never run into him again.” Eek.
12/03/2015 Wilco formed in 1994, and 21 years later, they released their 9th album, Star Wars. In this episode, Jeff Tweedy, the band’s singer and principal songwriter, breaks down the song Magnetized. In addition to collaborating with his five bandmates, John Stirrit, Pat Sansone, Mike Jorgensen, Nels Cline, and Glenn Kotche, it turns out Jeff Tweedy makes an active effort to remove his own ego from the process of songwriting. This episode is sponsored by Vinyl Me Please, Turntable Lab, and lynda.com.
The genius of this podcast is its simplicity. Each episode focuses on one song, which is lovingly dissected, note by note, by the musician who created it. The result is equally compelling for a listener who’s very knowledgeable about music and someone who likes music but knows nothing about it (me). Recent shows involve the punk-rock legend Iggy Pop breaking down American Valhalla off his most recent album, Björk discussing her song Stonemilker, and Dustin O’Halloran, the composer of the Amazon show Transparent, explaining how he made its theme song. Radio critics everywhere have been freaking out about Song Exploder since it began in 2014, and their praise is well deserved. As New York magazine said, “Song Exploder is probably the best use of the podcast format ever.”
04/07/2016Jennifer Finney Boylan -- an accomplished writer, academic and activist -- reads her own essay about coming out as transgender to her two young sons.
Three months ago, when the New York Times introduced a podcast version of its wildly popular column, Modern Love, some diehard fans weren’t sure it would have the same appeal as the written essays, which have been a weekly ritual for millions of readers since they began appearing in print in 2004. But the podcast is elegant and emotional. Plus, the stories are narrated by an array of actors, like Sarah Silverman, America Ferrera, Judd Apatow and January Jones. Prepare to listen to an engrossing collection of true relationship stories — just keep your tissues at the ready.