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03/15/2016Welcome to Beautiful Stories from Anonymous People! Every week, Chris Gethard opens the phone lines to one caller, for one hour, and he can't hang up, no matter what. In this debut episode, Chris talks to a true underdog in Texas who has both a fasci...
In all its various broadcast homes, “The Chris Gethard Show” has been one of the most thrilling weekly experiments on TV. So it makes sense that a Gethard-hosted podcast would have the same comedic blend of empathy and honesty. The show is built on conversations between Gethard and anonymous callers, governed only by two rules: the phone line closes after an hour, but Gethard can’t hang up before then. The host has a keen sense for the unspoken questions, the topics that each caller wants to discuss but can’t quite figure out how to broach. Not afraid to let callers turn the questions onto him, these talks have a way of culminating in a common understanding between strangers, which can be as therapeutic for a listener as it is for the two parties involved. And there’s no better place to start than the premiere, which ends with a moment so cathartic, it’ll make you an instant fan of both the individuals involved.
03/15/2016A conversation about government bureaucracy quickly goes deep. In this episode, a man with a clever passport hack reveals his exodus from Orthodox Judaism, and what it feels like (and tastes like) when you lose faith and break away.
In all its various broadcast homes, “The Chris Gethard Show” has been one of the most thrilling weekly experiments on TV. So it makes sense that a Gethard-hosted podcast would have the same comedic blend of empathy and honesty. The show is built on conversations between Gethard and anonymous callers, governed only by two rules: the phone line closes after an hour, but Gethard can’t hang up before then. The host has a keen sense for the unspoken questions, the topics that each caller wants to discuss but can’t quite figure out how to broach. Not afraid to let callers turn the questions onto him, these talks have a way of culminating in a common understanding between strangers, which can be as therapeutic for a listener as it is for the two parties involved. And there’s no better place to start than the premiere, which ends with a moment so cathartic, it’ll make you an instant fan of both the individuals involved.
05/04/2016Jon Favreau and Dan Pfeiffer, former advisers to President Obama, host their inaugural joint podcast to discuss the political world, Trump and the media, Rubio's missteps, the future of the Republican Party, and the television battles between Clinton and Trump.
Amidst an election season that’s alternated between chaotic and soul-crushing in equal measure, it’s been fascinating to filter each week’s craziness through the perspective of two individuals who’ve been buried deep within the past two major presidential cycles. Former speechwriter Jon Favreau and Strategy and Communications Advisor Dan Pfeiffer (both of whom worked on President Obama’s national campaigns and in the White House) are each invested insiders and passionate outside observers of 2016’s descent into madness. A weekly look at the current state of political media, it’s also a dependable repository for great White House anecdotes. Alongside fellow former speechwriter Jon Lovett, the show’s seventh episode featured the trio recounting the choicest lines from the President’s various Correspondents Dinner appearances (particularly those delivered in the immediate wake of ordering the Bin Laden compound strike).
05/12/2016Jon and Dan talk about Trump's attempts to pivot, "cocky" Democrats, close polls, and The NYT Magazine’s Ben Rhodes profile. Then, ‘Meet the Press’ host Chuck Todd joins (50:30) to discuss Trump hacking the political process, Todd’s critiques of the media, and the future of political journalism.
Amidst an election season that’s alternated between chaotic and soul-crushing in equal measure, it’s been fascinating to filter each week’s craziness through the perspective of two individuals who’ve been buried deep within the past two major presidential cycles. Former speechwriter Jon Favreau and Strategy and Communications Advisor Dan Pfeiffer (both of whom worked on President Obama’s national campaigns and in the White House) are each invested insiders and passionate outside observers of 2016’s descent into madness. A weekly look at the current state of political media, it’s also a dependable repository for great White House anecdotes. Alongside fellow former speechwriter Jon Lovett, the show’s seventh episode featured the trio recounting the choicest lines from the President’s various Correspondents Dinner appearances (particularly those delivered in the immediate wake of ordering the Bin Laden compound strike).
06/10/2016 When Chief Justice Earl Warren was asked at the end of his career, “What was the most important case of your tenure?”, there were a lot of answers he could have given. After all, he had presided over some of the most important decisions in the court’s history  cases that dealt with segregation in schools, the right to an attorney, the right to remain silent, just to name a few. But his answer was a surprise: He said, “Baker v. Carr,” a 1962 redistricting case.  On this episode of More Perfect, we talk about why this case was so important; important enough, in fact, that it pushed one Supreme Court justice to a nervous breakdown, brought a boiling feud to a head, put one justice in the hospital, and changed the course of the Supreme Court — and the nation — forever. Associate Justice William O. Douglas (L) and Associate Justice Felix Frankfurter (R) (Harris & Ewing Photography/Library of Congress) Top Row (left-right): Charles E. WhittakerJohn M. Harlan,William J. Brennan, Jr.Potter Stewart. Bottom Row (left-right): William O. DouglasHugo L. BlackEarl WarrenFelix FrankfurterTom C. Clark. (Library of Congress)    Associate Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Whittaker at his desk in his chambers. (Heywood Davis)  The key links: - Biographies of Charles Evans Whittaker, Felix Frankfurter, and William O. Douglas from Oyez - A biography of Charles Evans Whittaker written by Craig Alan Smith - A biography of Felix Frankfurter written by H.N. Hirsch - A biography of William O. Douglas written by Bruce Allen Murphy - A book about the history of "one person, one vote" written by J. Douglas Smith - A roundtable discussion on C-SPAN about Baker v. Carr The key voices: - Craig Smith, Charles Whittaker's biographer and Professor of History and Political Science at California University of Pennsylvania - Tara Grove, Professor of Law and Robert and Elizabeth Scott Research Professor at William & Mary Law School - Louis Michael Seidman, Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Constitutional Law at Georgetown Law - Guy-Uriel Charles, Charles S. Rhyne Professor of Law at Duke Law - Samuel Issacharoff, Bonnie and Richard Reiss Professor of Constitutional Law, NYU Law - J. Douglas Smith, author of "On Democracy's Doorstep" - Alan Kohn, former Supreme Court clerk for Charles Whittaker, 1957 Term - Kent Whittaker, Charles Whittaker's son - Kate Whittaker, Charles Whittaker's granddaughter The key cases: - 1962: Baker v. Carr - 2000: Bush v. Gore - 2016: Evenwel v. Abbott Music in this episode by Gyan Riley, Alex Overington, David Herman, Tobin Low and Jad Abumrad.  More Perfect is funded in part by The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation, and the Joyce Foundation. Supreme Court archival audio comes from Oyez®, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell. Archival interviews with Justice William O. Douglas come from the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections at Princeton University Library. Special thanks to Whittaker's clerks: Heywood Davis, Jerry Libin and James Adler. Also big thanks to Jerry Goldman at Oyez.
Some of the best new podcasts of the year have focused on institutions, whether they’re more abstract (American Public Media’s The Uncertain Hour focuses on policies and practice within America’s welfare system) or more defined, as with More Perfect’s close examination of the Supreme Court. In its pilot episode, this Radiolab presentation trains its microphones on the pivotal individuals at the center of multiple states’ capital punishment programs. Layered with the trademark attention to atmospheric sound design that makes its parent podcast such a reliable listen, More Perfect should provide a healthy perspective amidst a judicial branch currently in flux.
03/10/2016Tony-nominated actor Stephen Bogardus brings us a tale of two sex drives.
Sarah Paulson’s central role as Marcia Clark was one of the main reasons the “American Crime Story: The People vs. O.J. Simpson” grabbed the public’s attention in the year’s early months. But Paulson also gave another 2016-best performance in a venue where no one could see her face. WBUR’s Modern Love enlists notable performers like Paulson to perform entries from the regular New York Times column that highlights love in all its forms. Paulson reads Amy Seek’s story of navigating an open adoption with a gentleness that conveys the underlying heartbreak without being manipulative. While other episodes usually succeed on the strength of the performance, this one features a conversation with Seek herself, whose recollection of the events she details in her piece and the six years since is a powerful addendum to a story beautifully told.
12/03/2014Twenty years ago, Ethan Zuckerman did something terrible on the internet. And he's still living with the consequences.
This Gimlet show has been the best podcast in existence for the better part of a year now, so to pick just one standout episode is particularly difficult. But the edge goes to the four-episode arc centered on Paul Modrowski, whose blog written from inside prison (where he’s currently serving a life sentence) first attracted the attention of producer Sruthi Pinnamaneni last year. What begins as an investigation of the logistics behind the posting of Modrowski’s expansive online diary eventually uncovers questions surrounding his incarceration. Like the best true crime stories, it balances the details of the central murder cases with a careful consideration of the individuals who allegedly inhabited its timeline. Most popular true crime podcasts keep the perspective of a single narrator, but Pinnamaneni sprinkles in just enough input from regular hosts Alex Goldman and PJ Vogt to add a conversational, illustrative layer to Modrowski’s story. Pinnamaneni’s reporting is extensive and forthright, the kind that will make you want to do your own outside research as soon as the last chapter ends.
03/29/2016An aspiring voice actor talks about using jokes to help with the hard times, and explains how she frames success. Plus she asks Chris the most important question he has ever faced: if you were to be eaten by an animal of your choice, which one would...
In all its various broadcast homes, “The Chris Gethard Show” has been one of the most thrilling weekly experiments on TV. So it makes sense that a Gethard-hosted podcast would have the same comedic blend of empathy and honesty. The show is built on conversations between Gethard and anonymous callers, governed only by two rules: the phone line closes after an hour, but Gethard can’t hang up before then. The host has a keen sense for the unspoken questions, the topics that each caller wants to discuss but can’t quite figure out how to broach. Not afraid to let callers turn the questions onto him, these talks have a way of culminating in a common understanding between strangers, which can be as therapeutic for a listener as it is for the two parties involved. And there’s no better place to start than the premiere, which ends with a moment so cathartic, it’ll make you an instant fan of both the individuals involved.
03/31/2016Meet the people inside a house at the center of an HIV outbreak in Indiana. Find Kelly McEvers on Twitter @kellymcevers. Email us at embedded@npr.org.
As an NPR production, Kelly McEvers and the staff of “Embedded” demonstrate one of the essential values of great journalism: the power to use specific stories to generate empathy for groups of people often discussed in the abstract. “Embedded” is a ground-up approach to documenting various cross-sections of communities, highlighting the individuals to present an alternative to the group characterization that often befalls them. The premiere episode finds McEvers profiling the residents of a shared home in Austin, Indiana, where opioids have become an inescapable addiction for its residence. The details are stark, unsettling and unadorned. Perhaps the best proof of the value of a show like “Embedded” is that the people at the center of these stories don’t end after a half hour: an Austin resident was the subject of their first follow-up story.
05/19/2016When you play basketball in the NBA's minor league – it's called the D-League — the stands aren't full, the schedule is grueling, and the pay can be as low as $13,000 a year. Compare that to the NBA, where the profile is high and the salary is way higher. Playing in the D-League is a moonshot for every player, just waiting to get that call-up to the NBA. We follow two players through the highs and lows of an entire D-League season. You can follow Kelly McEvers on Twitter @KellyMcEvers, Uri Berliner @uberliner and Tom Goldman @TomGoldmanNPR. You can email us at Embedded@npr.org.
As an NPR production, Kelly McEvers and the staff of “Embedded” demonstrate one of the essential values of great journalism: the power to use specific stories to generate empathy for groups of people often discussed in the abstract. “Embedded” is a ground-up approach to documenting various cross-sections of communities, highlighting the individuals to present an alternative to the group characterization that often befalls them. The premiere episode finds McEvers profiling the residents of a shared home in Austin, Indiana, where opioids have become an inescapable addiction for its residence. The details are stark, unsettling and unadorned. Perhaps the best proof of the value of a show like “Embedded” is that the people at the center of these stories don’t end after a half hour: an Austin resident was the subject of their first follow-up story.
04/26/2016As Game Of Thrones returns from hiatus, and moves beyond the books, the gang plus Jeff and Nick talked about Jon Snow, Crone Castle, and what's next for the Starks. We went around the dial with Better Call Saul, Valleys Silicon and Happy, Houdini & Doyle, Project Runway All-Stars, and the National Enquirer before putting Angie's 30 Rock Canon submission under a "Black Light." Humans? Heard of 'em (they're winners), whoever has to retitle Live With Someone and Maybe Kelly is a loser, and Rib Hurtmann changed a few things in this week's Game Time. Don't lose us in the tall grass; it's an all-new Extra Hot Great. Episode Rundown 00:00:00 Intro 00:01:30 Game Of Thrones 00:21:10 Sponsor: Buy An EHG Ad 00:21:45 Better Call Saul 00:25:20 Happy Valley 00:29:30 Houdini and Doyle 00:33:00 Silicon Valley 00:38:45 Project Runway All-Stars 00:42:10 Ads for things people wanted to know about 00:45:45 The Canon: 30 Rock Black Light Attack 01:03:45 Winner and Loser of the Week 01:06:00 Game Time: TV Typos 01:32:15 Outro
Extra Hot Great has been offering its special brand of TV observations over multiple podcast feed and co-host roster iterations. Now well past 100 episodes into its resurrection, the television discussion show has refined its dependable format, complete with a weekly consideration of a TV episode for induction in their Canon (spoiler alert: they don’t always make it, as is the case with the “30 Rock” episode discussed here). But what sets apart is the episode’s installment of the weekly Game Time feature. The gang plays an round of a listener-submitted game called TV Typos (basically, the round-robin game show version of #ChangeALetterRuinATVShow). What follows is 25 minutes of brilliant, dumb wordplay with enough built-in momentum to have each co-host sobbing by the end. It’s a testament to the co-host’s deep bench of TV minutiae that they’re able to anticipate some of these before they come. The seconds between when you can tell they have the answers and the moment they give them are some of the simplest joys you’ll find anywhere.
05/12/2016For years, Paul Modrowski has been writing a blog from inside a maximum security prison. Only thing is, he was arrested when he was 18 and has never seen the internet. Sruthi Pinnamaneni reaches out to him with one small question that alters the course of her next year.
This Gimlet show has been the best podcast in existence for the better part of a year now, so to pick just one standout episode is particularly difficult. But the edge goes to the four-episode arc centered on Paul Modrowski, whose blog written from inside prison (where he’s currently serving a life sentence) first attracted the attention of producer Sruthi Pinnamaneni last year. What begins as an investigation of the logistics behind the posting of Modrowski’s expansive online diary eventually uncovers questions surrounding his incarceration. Like the best true crime stories, it balances the details of the central murder cases with a careful consideration of the individuals who allegedly inhabited its timeline. Most popular true crime podcasts keep the perspective of a single narrator, but Pinnamaneni sprinkles in just enough input from regular hosts Alex Goldman and PJ Vogt to add a conversational, illustrative layer to Modrowski’s story. Pinnamaneni’s reporting is extensive and forthright, the kind that will make you want to do your own outside research as soon as the last chapter ends.
02/02/2016The old TWoP bullpen is reunited as Pop Culture Happy Hour's own Linda Holmes joins us for a discussion of American Crime Story, Ryan Murphy's dramatization of (this season) the O.J. Simpson murder trial. Where will your panelists fall on the matter of John Travolta and his Robert Shapiro eyebrows?! After Liv's latest report on Face Off, Around The Dial stops at Jane The Virgin, Rehab Addict, Hollywood Game Night, Drunk History, Ken Burns's Prohibition, and an ad from the '80s that maybe should have stayed there. Linda makes her (couch-)explosive case for the induction of the "Honeymoon In Metropolis" episode of Lois And Clark: The New Adventures Of Superman into the Canon. Finally, after naming the week's Winner and Loser, Game Time revisits the age-old question Is This Anything? Pull on your gloves and your Bruno Magli shoes and listen up! Episode Rundown 00:00:00 Intro 00:02:00 American Crime Story 00:24:20 Sponsor: EHG Micro: TV's Best Little Sisters 00:25:30 Face Off Report 00:31:00 Sponsor: Aly Tadros 00:32:50 Jane The Virgin 00:36:40 Rehab Addict 00:39:30 Hollywood Game Night 00:43:45 Drunk History 00:46:15 Another 80s Ad 00:48:45 Sponsor: The Pelfrey Foundation 00:50:30 The Canon: Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman Honeymoon In Metropolis 01:23:30 Winner and Loser of the Week 01:25:30 Sponsor: Two Guys On The Town 01:28:10 Game Time: Is This Anything? Competitive Edition 02:03:45 Outro
Extra Hot Great has been offering its special brand of TV observations over multiple podcast feed and co-host roster iterations. Now well past 100 episodes into its resurrection, the television discussion show has refined its dependable format, complete with a weekly consideration of a TV episode for induction in their Canon (spoiler alert: they don’t always make it, as is the case with the “30 Rock” episode discussed here). But what sets apart is the episode’s installment of the weekly Game Time feature. The gang plays an round of a listener-submitted game called TV Typos (basically, the round-robin game show version of #ChangeALetterRuinATVShow). What follows is 25 minutes of brilliant, dumb wordplay with enough built-in momentum to have each co-host sobbing by the end. It’s a testament to the co-host’s deep bench of TV minutiae that they’re able to anticipate some of these before they come. The seconds between when you can tell they have the answers and the moment they give them are some of the simplest joys you’ll find anywhere.
05/06/2016Jon and Dan are joined by Jon Lovett, a former speechwriter for President Obama, to discuss Trump’s triumph in the Northeast (6:00), the Cruz-Kasich alliance (8:00), the beginning of the "veepstakes" (16:00), Clinton's potential progressive VP options (22:00), the science of writing comedic speeches (28:00), and the best moments from Obama's White House Correspondents’ Dinner appearances (33:00).
Amidst an election season that’s alternated between chaotic and soul-crushing in equal measure, it’s been fascinating to filter each week’s craziness through the perspective of two individuals who’ve been buried deep within the past two major presidential cycles. Former speechwriter Jon Favreau and Strategy and Communications Advisor Dan Pfeiffer (both of whom worked on President Obama’s national campaigns and in the White House) are each invested insiders and passionate outside observers of 2016’s descent into madness. A weekly look at the current state of political media, it’s also a dependable repository for great White House anecdotes. Alongside fellow former speechwriter Jon Lovett, the show’s seventh episode featured the trio recounting the choicest lines from the President’s various Correspondents Dinner appearances (particularly those delivered in the immediate wake of ordering the Bin Laden compound strike).
05/06/2016Jon and Dan recap the major story lines of the week: Bill Clinton's finger-wagging, De Blasio's botched bit with Hillary, President Obama's 'GoT' viewership, Trump's new hires, and Cruz's craziness. Then, former White House adviser and actor Kal Penn hops on the line to break down Bernie's hopes for the nomination, pushing grassroots political action, and Obama's legacy.
Amidst an election season that’s alternated between chaotic and soul-crushing in equal measure, it’s been fascinating to filter each week’s craziness through the perspective of two individuals who’ve been buried deep within the past two major presidential cycles. Former speechwriter Jon Favreau and Strategy and Communications Advisor Dan Pfeiffer (both of whom worked on President Obama’s national campaigns and in the White House) are each invested insiders and passionate outside observers of 2016’s descent into madness. A weekly look at the current state of political media, it’s also a dependable repository for great White House anecdotes. Alongside fellow former speechwriter Jon Lovett, the show’s seventh episode featured the trio recounting the choicest lines from the President’s various Correspondents Dinner appearances (particularly those delivered in the immediate wake of ordering the Bin Laden compound strike).