Hey there! We will be winding down operations and ending support for Audiosear.ch on 11/28/17. We've loved seeing what you've built with this technology and are grateful for your support over the years.

Wired Podcasts of the Week

Recommendations

02/17/2016All around the country, there stands a figure so much a part of historical architecture and urban landscapes that she is rarely noticed. She has gone by many names, from Star Maiden to Priestess of Culture, Spirit of Life to Mourning Victory. Now nearly forgotten, Audrey Munson was once the most famous artist's model in the United States. In and beyond her time, she has represented many things, including truth, memory, seasons, the stars, and even the universe itself. Immortalized in iron, marble and gold, Audrey remains perched on high, quietly watching over cities from coast to coast. Miss Manhattan
One woman’s body adorns libraries and city halls and museum courtyards across the country. But who is she? Like the best 99% Invisible episodes, “Miss Manhattan” investigates an architectural element hidden in plain sight. It’s the story of Audrey Munson, “America’s first supermodel,” and her path from serving as inspiration for over 30 statues at the Met to a sensationalized murder scandal to becoming a rollerblading eccentric in a small town. Listen here.
06/28/2016 Last week, the court decided one of this term’s blockbuster cases — a case that could affect the future of affirmative action in this country. The plaintiff was Abigail Fisher, a white woman, who said she was rejected from the University of Texas because the university unfairly considered race as one of many factors when evaluating applicants. And while Fisher’s claims were the focus of the case, the story behind how she ended up in front of the Supreme Court is a lot more complicated. Edward Blum is the director of the Project on Fair Representation (AEI) On this episode, we visit Edward Blum, a 64-year-old “legal entrepreneur” and former stockbroker who has become something of a Supreme Court matchmaker — He takes an issue, finds the perfect plaintiff, matches them with lawyers, and works his way to the highest court in the land. He’s had remarkable success, with 6 cases heard before the Supreme Court, including that of Abigail Fisher. We also head to Houston, Texas, where in 1998, an unusual 911 call led to one of the most important LGBT rights decisions in the Supreme Court’s history. John Lawrence (L) and Tyron Garner (R) at the 2004 Pride Parade in Houston (J.D. Doyle/Houston LGBT History) Mitchell Katine (L) introduces Tyron Garner (Middle) and John Lawrence (R) at a rally celebrating the court's decision (J.D. Doyle/Houston LGBT History) The key links: - The website Edward Blum is using to find plaintiffs for a case he is building against Harvard University - Susan Carle's book on the history of legal ethics - An obituary for Tyron Garner when he died in 2006 - An obituary for John Lawrence when he died in 2011 - Dale Carpenter's book on the history of Lawrence v. Texas - A Lambda Legal documentary on the story of Lawrence v. Texas The key voices: - Edward Blum, director of the Project on Fair Representation - Susan Carle, professor of law at the American University Washington College of Law - Dale Carpenter, professor of Law at the SMU Dedman School of Law - Mitchell Katine, lawyer at Katine & Nechman L.L.P.  - Lane Lewis, chair of the Harris County Democratic Party The key cases: - 1896: Plessy v. Ferguson - 1917: Buchanan v. Warley - 1962: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People v. Button - 1986: Bowers v. Hardwick - 1996: Bush v. Vera - 2003: Lawrence v. Texas - 2009: Northwest Austin Municipal Utility District Number One v. Holder - 2013: Shelby County v. Holder - 2013: Fisher v. University of Texas (1) - 2016: Evenwel v. Abbott - 2016: Fisher v. University of Texas (2) Special thanks to Ari Berman. His book Give Us the Ballot, and his reporting for The Nation, were hugely helpful in reporting this episode.   More Perfect is funded in part by The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation, and the Joyce Foundation. Supreme Court archival audio comes from Oyez®, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.
Meet Edward Blum, Supreme Court matchmaker. In six landmark cases, the “legal entrepreneur” has hand-picked just the right plaintiffs necessary to change American laws through the highest court in the land. More Perfect, the Radiolab spinoff all about the Supreme Court, is worth listening to in its entirety. Start with the unlikely path of how one 911 call led to the end of sodomy laws, and the essential role of strategy in choosing representative cases. Listen here.
11/16/2016New clients arrive. A customer asks for the bill. The airport signage needs a lot of work. A bird wakes up in the Everglades. Homecoming was created and written by Eli Horowitz and Micah Bloomberg; directed by Eli Horowitz; sound design, editing, and music by Mark Henry Phillips; produced by Alicia Van Couvering and Mark Henry Phillips; casting by Henry Russell Bergstein. Homecoming is a production of Gimlet Media. HEIDI BERGMAN - Catherine Keener WALTER CRUZ - Oscar Isaac COLIN BELFAST - David Schwimmer DARA EACKLES - Marsha Stephanie Blake THOMAS CARRASCO - Aaron Serotsky 
2016 has been a great year for fiction podcasts: Archive 81, Hector Vs the Future, Alice Isn’t Dead, The Deep Vault, The Radio Adventures of Eleanor Amplified. But Homecoming, from the inventive brain of Eli Horowitz, offers audio fiction of a different kind: There’s no found footage or reporterly set-up here. Instead, you’re dropped right into a psychological thriller about what went down at a military reentry facility—and it stars Catherine Keener, Oscar Isaac, and David Schwimmer.
10/13/2016To reach a port, we must set sail.
The best Reply All episodes are Internet rabbit holes explored to the extreme, and “Boy in Photo” offers enough twists and turns for even the most insatiable sleuths. In 2006, an ILX message board rallied around a photo of two girls and one lonely-looking guy, whom the message board named “Wayne.” The members of the message board followed the lives of the characters on social media for the next 10 years. In this episode, host PJ Vogt apprehensively travels to the Philadelphia suburb where he grew up to track down the real Wayne—and find out what really happened that night.
10/12/2016In 2014 the town of Seneca, Nebraska was so deeply divided that they weighed their own self-destruction.  
What do you do with a populace so divided there’s no hope? We don’t know the answer for America, but in Seneca, Nebraska, the citizens trusted in democracy—and put their existence up to a vote. After small-town squabbles became irreconcilable differences, the denizens hit the polls to decide whether to unincorporate, or whether there was any value in keeping the town together. Listen here.
09/23/2016 When Axton Betz-Hamilton was 11 years old, her parents' identities were stolen. At that time, in the early 90s, consumer protection services for identity theft victims were basically non-existent. So the family dealt with the consequences as best they could. But then when Axton got to college, she realized that her identity had been stolen as well. Her credit score was in the lowest 2%.  As she was working to restore her credit, she inadvertently discovered who had stolen the family's identity. It would change everything forever.   View the photograph Axton describes here.   If you live in Los Angeles, Washington D.C., Durham, Philadelphia, Anaheim, Brooklyn, Boston, Chicago, Iowa City, Minneapolis, Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, or Toronto. . . come see us tell all new stories live! Learn more at http://thisiscriminal.com/live/.  Criminal is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX.  
Criminal reliably offers bizarre stories of true crimes that will stay with you. In “Money Tree,” hear about Axton Betz-Hamilton: When she was 11, someone stole her parents’ identities. As a college student with bills to pay, she realized that they had stolen her identity, too—and then she set out to determine who that person was. What she found hit closer to home than she—or we—ever would have thought. Stick around for the twist.
07/26/2016Today we try to figure out what happens when our future presidential candidates have thousands of Tweets and Tumblr posts and Instagrams in their online record. What happens, when today’s teens start running for office? When their entire internet history is there, searchable, for us to read? What if these teens Tweet something at 15 that they might regret at 45? Do we learn to accept that their opinions have changed? Or do we go through every candidate's entire social media history to find dirt on them? Does that tactic still work in the future? Or do we all just throw up our hands and admit that teens have bad opinions and that hopefully those opinions have changed? To find out, I talked to a real live young person with political ambitions, Eve Zhurbinskiy a student at George Washington University. She describes her own social media strategy, and how she never Tweets without thinking about how it might come back to bite her. She also talks about going back and deleting Facebook posts and even in one case her entire Tumblr because she thought it might be used against her. And that’s not paranoid, I also talk to someone who tracks that kind of thing among politicians. Josh Stewart from the Sunlight Foundation explains what Politwoops is and why they’re tracking the deleted Tweets of politicians. And to round things out this episode I talked to someone who’s got a lot of experience managing digital campaigns for today’s politicians. Laura Olin was one of the first hires for Obama’s 2012 digital team, and she not only ran the Obama Tumblr, but she also actually Tweeted as the President. Throughout the episode we discuss all kinds of questions about how we think about and forgive humans. In March of this year, a State Supreme Court justice from Wisconsin named Rebecca Bradley issued an apology for some columns that she wrote 24 years ago in a student newspaper. In the columns she referred to gay people as “queers” and called people with AIDS “degenerates who basically commit suicide through their behavior.” She also said that it would be better to get AIDS than cancer, because, quote “those afflicted with the politically correct disease will be getting all of the funding.” And that abortion is like the Holocaust and slavery. Bradley says that she was, quote “frankly embarrassed at the content and tone of what I wrote those many years ago” but she also said that when she wrote them, she was “a very young student.” Now the release of these 24 year old columns wasn’t random, the organization that found the columns unveiled them just a month before voters in Wisconsin would vote on whether or not Bradley should retain her seat on the court. People who wanted Bradley off the court, said that the comments in the columns were so hateful that time didn’t really matter. People who wanted Bradley to say said that she had grown and learned since then, and did not still hold those beliefs. (To be clear, there was also a contingent of people who supported Bradley because they still do hold those beliefs). So, voters in Wisconsin could decide. And they decided to keep her, Bradley won her seat back. So you could interpret that as evidence that past transgressions can be forgiven, right?   So this brings us to one version of this future. A future in which voters learn to approach their candidates as flawed individuals, people who have made missteps, people who can change their mind. This isn’t to say that we let people off the hook for their past, but rather that we are okay with them saying “I was wrong, and here’s how I’ve changed for the better.” I think there’s an interesting ethical question here. Is there some kind of fundamental threshold for past behavior or comments after which the person becomes unredeemable. Like, are there some things that are so bad that we’re just not willing to let that person be elected even if they say they’ve changed. Are there some things that are so hateful that...
Each week on Flash Forward, host Rose Eveleth imagines a future based on fictional scenarios, from the strange disappearance of the Internet to nefarious space pirates. This episode, about the political ramifications of our digital histories, is especially prescient as we lurch towards a new administration. It also has an interview with Laura Olin, who ran Obama’s presidential campaign Twitter account, in which she discusses changing American standards about a politician’s previous beliefs.
09/23/2016Buzz and Sheldon are brothers in their eighties who have been estranged for decades. Buzz visits Sheldon to see if there’s still a relationship left to salvage. Our Sponsors Calm.com - Visit calm.com/heavyweight to start your free trial. Mailchimp – More than 12 million people use MailChimp to connect with their customers, market their products, and grow their businesses every day. Wealthsimple – Investing made easy. Get your first $10,000 managed for free. Credits Heavyweight is hosted and produced by Jonathan Goldstein.  This episode was also produced by Wendy Dorr, Chris Neary, and Kalila Holt.  Editing by Alex Blumberg and Peter Clowney.  Special thanks to Caitlin Kenney, Starlee Kine, and Rachel Ward.  The show was mixed by Haley Shaw.  Music in this episode by Christine Fellows, with additional music and ad music by Haley Shaw. Our theme song is by The Weakerthans courtesy of Epitaph Records.  A version of this story appeared on This American Life, and we had a lot of help from the folks there: Ira Glass, Julie Snyder, Jonathan Menjivar, Sean Cole, and Robyn Semian. A very special thanks to Emily Condon.
On Heavyweight, Jonathan Goldstein acts as a professional meddler, helping people fix (or at least relive) something from their past. In the first episode, the host starts with his own family, talking his octogenarian dad and uncle through the missed bar mitzvahs, ruined bris, and shirked funereal responsibilities that have kept the brothers apart for 20 years. Like the rest of the Heavyweight season, Goldstein’s prying into his own family history is a delight.
10/27/2015 Session 1 with Samantha Barnes, a young woman with a Level 10, Class D ability. She found me through the ad I placed in the paper offering "therapy for the strange and unusual".      Visit www.thebrightsessions.com  
Dr. Bright’s therapy patients have some normal concerns: unrequited teenage love, parent-child relationships. But they’ve got some more abnormal worries, too, like uncontrollable time travel and Kilgrave-like mind control. Part Professor X, part Sigmund Freud, Dr. Bright’s specialty—treating “the strange and unusual”—makes for very fun audio intrigue. The season finale doesn’t disappoint, but start from episode one and binge away a weekend on Dr. Strange’s couch.
12/06/2016There’s a word that has become shorthand for ‘the war on Christmas’ with a side of ‘political correctness gone mad’: Winterval. It began in November 1998. Newspapers furiously accused Birmingham City Council of renaming Christmas when it ran festive events under the name ‘Winterval’. The council’s then-head of events Mike Chubb explains the true meaning … Continue reading 48. Winterval
Feeling Grinchy this holiday season? You’re not alone. The Allusionist goes back into the history of the War on Christmas through the ages. Meet Mike Chubb, the man behind a miscalculated holiday economizing by the Birmingham city council, when they renamed December 25 “Winterval.” Happy Festivus to you and yours!Feeling Grinchy this holiday season? You’re not alone. The Allusionist goes back into the history of the War on Christmas through the ages. Meet Mike Chubb, the man behind a miscalculated holiday economizing by the Birmingham city council, when they renamed December 25 “Winterval.” Happy Festivus to you and yours!
12/14/2016Ta-Nehisi Coates is an author at the Atlantic. His book, Between the World and Me, won the National Book Award, and was spoofed on SNL. He's writing the (awesome) Black Panther series for Marvel. He's a certified MacArthur Genius. And he just released a blockbuster story based on hours of interviews with President Obama about the role race played in Obama's upbringing, his presidency, and the 2016 campaign. Coates is also one of my favorite people to talk to, and I think this conversation shows why. The first half of our conversation is political: it's about Coates's conversations with Obama, his impressions of the president, his perspective on American politics, the way his atheism informs his worldview, why he thinks a tragic outlook is important for finding the truth but — at least for nonwhite politicians — a hindrance for winning political power.  The second half is much more personal: it's about his frustrations as a writer, his discomfort with the way "Between the World and Me" was adopted by white audiences, how he learns, his surprising advice for young writers, his belief that personal stability enables professional wildness, his past as a blogger, his desire to return to school, his favorite books.  I loved this interview. I think you will, too.
After hundreds of hours of conversation with President Obama, Ta-Nehisi Coates talks to Ezra Klein about how the Democrats became the party of non-whites, how Obama finessed the presidency, and why we must maintain a sense of tragedy in American politics. But the most insightful turns come from a more personal space: Coates unpacks his discomfort after resonating with white audiences, and why young writers should have a disciplined, ordinary personal life in order to have an extraordinary creative life. Listen here. Credit: Vox After hundreds of hours of conversation with President Obama, Ta-Nehisi Coates talks to Ezra Klein about how the Democrats became the party of non-whites, how Obama finessed the presidency, and why we must maintain a sense of tragedy in American politics. But the most insightful turns come from a more personal space: Coates unpacks his discomfort after resonating with white audiences, and why young writers should have a disciplined, ordinary personal life in order to have an extraordinary creative life. Listen here.
11/20/2016Welcome to Providence, Rhode Island, a city where organized crime corrupted every aspect of public life. In the first episode of Crimetown, a young prosecutor named Buddy Cianci takes on a gruesome murder case. As the investigation heats up, Buddy goes head to head with the most notorious mob boss in the country—and launches a career that will change Providence forever. For credits and more information about this episode, visit crimetownshow.com. Our Sponsors Blue Apron - to get your first three meals free with free shipping, go to blueapron.com/crimetown. Mailchimp – More than 12 million people use MailChimp to connect with their customers, market their products, and grow their businesses every day. Squarespace - For 10% off your first purchase go to Squarespace.com and use the offer code "CRIME" at checkout.
After a felony conviction, Providence mayor Buddy Cianci resigned—and then got re-elected. Crimetown kicks off its season examining the life of Rhode Island’s most charismatic felon-in-office with a case from 40 years ago, when Cianci first developed a reputation as an anti-corruption lawyer while prosecuting famous mob boss Raymond Patriarca. Featuring Joey One-Arm, Joey Bad Way, and all the Rhode Island accents you hoped for.After a felony conviction, Providence mayor Buddy Cianci resigned—and then got re-elected. Crimetown kicks off its season examining the life of Rhode Island’s most charismatic felon-in-office with a case from 40 years ago, when Cianci first developed a reputation as an anti-corruption lawyer while prosecuting famous mob boss Raymond Patriarca. Featuring Joey One-Arm, Joey Bad Way, and all the Rhode Island accents you hoped for.
11/21/2016Every job has its freedoms and limitations, but sometimes all you need to endure the ups and downs is a noble purpose. This week: A man who saves airline passengers from errant wildlife and another who's made it his life's work to build a country for the nationless.
This holiday weekend, 49 million Americans took to the skies. Hopefully, not one of those planes had a snake aboard. But if it did, airport wildlife managers like Rob Shevalier could save the day. Shevalier worked on airport runways, until he decided to become a falconer and save passengers from errant creatures in the air. This episode of Work in Progress also features Mohamed Alborno, a stateless person who plans to create a country for himself—online. Listen here. Credit: Slack This holiday weekend, 49 million Americans took to the skies. Hopefully, not one of those planes had a snake aboard. But if it did, airport wildlife managers like Rob Shevalier could save the day. Shevalier worked on airport runways, until he decided to become a falconer and save passengers from errant creatures in the air. This episode of Work in Progress also features Mohamed Alborno, a stateless person who plans to create a country for himself—online. Listen here.
11/16/2016New clients arrive. A customer asks for the bill. The airport signage needs a lot of work. A bird wakes up in the Everglades. Homecoming was created and written by Eli Horowitz and Micah Bloomberg; directed by Eli Horowitz; sound design, editing, and music by Mark Henry Phillips; produced by Alicia Van Couvering and Mark Henry Phillips; casting by Henry Russell Bergstein. Homecoming is a production of Gimlet Media. HEIDI BERGMAN - Catherine Keener WALTER CRUZ - Oscar Isaac COLIN BELFAST - David Schwimmer DARA EACKLES - Marsha Stephanie Blake THOMAS CARRASCO - Aaron Serotsky 
In the opening scene of Homecoming, Catherine Keener and Oscar Isaac awkwardly introduce themselves to each other, making small talk about a fish. Like with writer and director Eli Horowitz’s previous creations (The Silent History, The Pickle Index), Gimlet’s first foray into fiction is strange, smart, and immersive—there’s no found footage gimmick here. Instead, you’re dropped right into a psychological thriller about what happened at a military reentry facility, starring Keener, Isaac, and a distracted, panicking David “Juice!” Schwimmer.In the opening scene of Homecoming, Catherine Keener and Oscar Isaac awkwardly introduce themselves to each other, making small talk about a fish. Like with writer and director Eli Horowitz’s previous creations (The Silent History, The Pickle Index), Gimlet’s first foray into fiction is strange, smart, and immersive—there’s no found footage gimmick here. Instead, you’re dropped right into a psychological thriller about what happened at a military reentry facility, starring Keener, Isaac, and a distracted, panicking David “Juice!” Schwimmer.
11/10/2016 It was 30 years ago this fall that Oprah Winfrey first said “hellooooo” to a national audience. By the show’s finale in 2011, it was aired in 145 countries and watched by more than 40 million viewers a week in the U.S. alone. Today’s daytime hosts like Ellen and Dr. Oz? They now average only about a tenth of that. If Oprah mentioned a book title, it became a best-seller. She landed the interviews that no one else could get. Her message of spirituality and empowerment influenced millions. With an hourlong daytime TV show, Oprah built a powerful brand. She made billions. And, as CNN, USA Today, Forbes and Time Magazine all proclaimed, she became the most powerful woman in America. In the first of a three-part podcast series, Oprah and former producers talk with WBEZ's Jenn White about the early, scrappy days of the program. Phil Donahue reflects on Oprah's entry into the daytime talk landscape that he once dominated. Plus, the podcast revisits milestones from the 1980s, like the show's national debut, and some mixed feelings over the show's highest-rated episode ever.
30 years ago, then-unknown Oprah Winfrey launched a talk show. This three-part series (You get an episode! You get an episode! And you get an episode!) from WBEZ Chicago traces her rise, from her competition with Phil Donahue in the early ‘80s to her openness about her weight issues to her regrets about the show’s highest-rated episode ever. Listen here. Credit: Ben Gabbe/Getty Images 30 years ago, then-unknown Oprah Winfrey launched a talk show. This three-part series (You get an episode! You get an episode! And you get an episode!) from WBEZ Chicago traces her rise, from her competition with Phil Donahue in the early ‘80s to her openness about her weight issues to her regrets about the show’s highest-rated episode ever. Listen here.